THE RECORD
Contemporary ART and VINYL

at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University (Durham, North Carolina)

September 2, 2010 – February 6, 2011

Preview Week: August 26 – September 1, 2010

Opening Event and DJ Party: Wednesday, August 25, 2010, 8:30 – 10:30 PM

“The Record: Contemporary Art and Vinyl,” the groundbreaking exhibition that explores the culture of vinyl records through 50 years of contemporary art. Celebrate with artists William Cordova, Harrison Haynes, Taiyo Kimura, Tim Lee, David McConnell, Mingering Mike, 9th Wonder, Fatimah Tuggar and Lyota Yagi. Listen to records with New York-based DJs Piotr Orlov and Dave Tompkins, who contributed essays to the exhibition catalogue.

The exhibition includes a broad range of works, such as a hybrid violin and record player, Viophonograph, a seminal work by Laurie Anderson; David Byrne’s original life-sized Polaroid photomontage used for the cover of the 1978 Talking Heads album More Songs About Buildings and Food; a monumental column of vinyl records by Cordova; and an important early work by Robleto, who melted down Billie Holiday records in an alchemic process to create hand-painted buttons. Works by Christian Marclay, who has made art with records for 30 years, include his early and rarely seen Recycled Records as well as his most recent record video, Looking for Love.

The Nasher Museum commissioned two works for The Record. Berlin-based artist Satch Hoyt created a 16-foot canoe made of red 45-rpm records with an original soundscape during a 2009 artist residency at Duke. New York artist Xaviera Simmons created photographs of the North Carolina landscape and solicited musical responses from musicians such as Mac McCaughan of Superchunk, Tunde Adebimpe of TV on the Radio and Jim James of My Morning Jacket. The original songs will be pressed onto a 12-inch record and played with her installation.

“Since the heyday of vinyl, and through its decline and recent resurgence, a surprising number of artists have worked with vinyl records. The Record presents some of the best, rarest and most unexpected examples. The artists in the exhibition use the vinyl record as metaphor, archive, artifact, icon, portrait, or transcendent medium.” – Trevor Schoonmaker, curator of contemporary art at the Nasher Museum

Listen to a podcast of an interview with Trevor Schoonmaker by Kitty Kinnin, host of the morning show and Sunday brunch on 100.7 The River.

More information here.